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Wildlife warrior
Wildlife Warriors (Australia Zoo

== This information is taken from the wildlife warriors website. http://www.wildlifewarriors.org.au/about_us/index.html

Where is it?Edit

The Australia Wildlife Hospital is located on Steve Irwin Way in Beerwah, Queensland, Australia

Visitors can travel to Australia zoo by car, bus, rail, courtesy coach or as part of day tours departing from the Gold Coast or Brisbane in Queenslad, Australia.

For details click here

http://www.australiazoo.com.au/visit-us/how-to-get-here/

Where it all began…Edit

Steve and Terri Irwin established Wildlife Warriors Worldwide in 2002, seeing a long-time dream of theirs fulfilled. Having done so much for conservation already, they only wanted to do more and help other conservationists achieve their goals as well. After putting together their dream team to run the organisation, the Irwins became patrons of the charity and had Australia Zoo become the Major Sponsor, committing to cover all administrative costs. A generous contribution such as this allows Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors to apply 100% of all public donations we receive directly to the conservation and preservation of wildlife.

Share the dream…Edit

Steve Irwin epitomised the Wildlife Warrior because he was the original; he created the term. This organisation is based on the very ideals of Steve Irwin and they will live in the hearts, the consciousness and in the daily lives of the Wildlife Warriors team as we share his dream of conservation and strive to make it a reality. We will miss you, boss, but we promise to put our hearts and souls into it for conservation, just like you did – every day.

About Wildlife Warriors Worldwide LtdEdit

Wildlife Warriors Worldwide Ltd was established in 2002, initially by Steve and Terri Irwin, as a way to include and involve other caring people to support the protection of injured, threatened or endangered wildlife – from the individual animal to an entire species.

Terri remains involved as our patron and significant supporter and advisor, but the charity now operates independently.

Wildlife Warriors Worldwide's ObjectivesEdit

  • To protect and enhance the natural environment
  • To provide information and education to the public and raise awareness of wildlife issues
  • To undertake biological research
  • To research, recommend and act in the protection of threatened or endangered species.
  • To enter into cooperative arrangements with like-minded organisations

Our VisionEdit

That people, wildlife and habitat survive and prosper without being detrimental to the existence of each other.

Our MissionEdit

To be the most effective wildlife conservation organisation in the world through the delivery of outstanding outcome-based programs and projects, and inclusive of humanity.

Programs and Projects - 2008 HighlightsEdit

  • Brand new Australian Wildlife Hospital opened
  • Whale Conservation project commenced
  • Koala Research
  • Nature Nic, our newest Ambassador for wildlife
  • Anatolian Shepherd Dog "Crikey" named for our support of cheetah conservation in South Africa
  • Tiger conservation- sponsorship of vehicles and other equipment to continue anti-poaching patrols
  • Elephant conservation, Sumatra and Cambodia
  • Orangutan conservation, Sumatra
  • Tasmanian Devil conservation- support of pilot project "Devil Island"

Australian Wildlife HospitalEdit

Located near Australia Zoo at Beerwah in Queensland, Australia, the Australian Wildlife Hospital was opened in March 2004, inspired by the memory of Lyn Irwin (Steve’s mum), who was a pioneer in wildlife care in Queensland. It was her dream to establish a wildlife hospital, and unfortunately this was not realised until after Lyn had passed away. Lyn’s dream now provides a lifeline for nature's innocent victims – her work lives on.

Wildlife Warriors to the Rescue!Edit

Thanks to the support of our major sponsor, Australia Zoo, a dedicated rescue team operates from the Australian Wildlife Hospital, collecting sick, injured and orphaned koalas and other native wildlife within south-east Queensland. These patients are provided with first-class care and rehabilitation before being released back into the wild.

Animal RehabEdit

The unit includes a veterinary facility with an intensive care room and laboratory, and separate holding facilities for males and females, and diseased and non-diseased koalas. There is also an orphan enclosure designed specifically to allow hand-raised koalas to develop climbing skills and minimise contact with human carers before being released back into the bush.

Working for a causeEdit

The Australian Wildlife Hospital has full-time veterinarians on board as well as a Hospital Manager, vet nurses and volunteers to provide first-class care for sick, injured and orphaned animals. The Hospital team also undertakes research into koala diseases, migration patterns and wildlife health management, and is consulting on land clearing.

Victims of our own success!Edit

The hospital is already overwhelmed with patients and getting busier every day. In November 2008 we were proud to officially open a new facility - the world's largest wildlife hospital - to accommodate this growing need.

  • Nearly 100 wildlife emergency calls are received every day
  • Up to 30 different species are admitted to the hospital every day
  • Currently over 50 koalas undergoing treatment
  • Approximately 70% of patients are victims of car accidents or domestic pet attacks
  • The cost to treat one animal ranges from $100 to thousands of dollars

VolunteeringEdit

Our volunteers are an integral part of the Australian Wildlife Hospital team. People decide to participate in our volunteer program for many different reasons, but the common element that draws our volunteers together is their love and passion for wildlife.

Many of the Australian Wildlife Hospital volunteers have come to the hospital as part of their work experience programs for school or university, or to gain experience to help further their careers. Others decide to volunteer to find out what it’s like to be a Wildlife Warrior, or simply to experience a different field of work to their own. Many volunteers come just for fun!

In completing the volunteer program, there is no guarantee of employment at the end of your time. For the animals’ safety there is minimal hands-on contact for the volunteers with the animals. The importance of keeping the animals in an environment which is stress-free and similar to their natural habitat is a priority. This means no unnecessary contact. If you would like more clarification on this issue please contact the Volunteer Coordinator before you apply.

It is preferable that volunteers nominate a regular day or days each week to come in. This is because we do follow a roster and will need confirmation ahead of time that you will be here. It will also help in placing new volunteers with experienced ones – and the more consistent you are, the more you'll learn!

Our volunteers are an integral part of the Australian Wildlife Hospital team. People decide to participate in our volunteer program for many different reasons, but the common element that draws our volunteers together is their love and passion for wildlife.

Many of the Australian Wildlife Hospital volunteers have come to the hospital as part of their work experience programs for school or university, or to gain experience to help further their careers. Others decide to volunteer to find out what it’s like to be a Wildlife Warrior, or simply to experience a different field of work to their own. Many volunteers come just for fun!

In completing the volunteer program, there is no guarantee of employment at the end of your time. For the animals’ safety there is minimal hands-on contact for the volunteers with the animals. The importance of keeping the animals in an environment which is stress-free and similar to their natural habitat is a priority. This means no unnecessary contact. If you would like more clarification on this issue please contact the Volunteer Coordinator before you apply.

It is preferable that volunteers nominate a regular day or days each week to come in. This is because we do follow a roster and will need confirmation ahead of time that you will be here. It will also help in placing new volunteers with experienced ones – and the more consistent you are, the more you'll learn!

Volunteer Duties (non-veterinary student)Edit

Cleaning enclosures

Preparing food for in-patients (mainly koalas)

Meeting people with the same passion and dedication to wildlife as you

Experience in the care and husbandry of wildlife

Getting to know the unique personalities of the various koalas we have as patients

Keeping the gardens and grounds need and tidy

90% of volunteer work is with koalas

Who to contact?Edit

AWH volunteer co-ordinators Leisa and Shirley

ph 07 5436 2097

email: volunteers@wildlifewarriors.org.au

Address: Steve Irwin Way, Beerwah, Qld, Australia

Or click here to download application forms, information brochures or apply online

http://www.wildlifewarriors.org.au/wildlife_hospital/volunteers.html

Vet Student Placements at the Australian Wildlife HospitalEdit

Who can apply?Edit

If you are a student studying Veterinary Science at an Australian or overseas University, you are eligible to apply for a placement at the Australian Wildlife Hospital for practical work experience.

What can I expect?Edit

Students at various stages of their degree come here for different reasons. You will be required to commit a minimum of five (5) consecutive days for this program, working from 8:00am – 5:00pm daily.

1st, 2nd and 3rd year students and Vet Nurse students are based outside in our general volunteer program. Here you will gain experience working in and around wildlife at the Hospital and get a good insight to what it's all about. You can get more information about this program on the volunteer main page.

4th – 5th year students are based in the clinic, working alongside our Veterinarians. You will have the opportunity to observe and assist with procedures, gaining unique experience with native Australian wildlife. What a great way to fulfill practical requirements for your university!

How do I apply?Edit

Vet students wishing to participate in our practical work experience program here at the Australian Wildlife Hospital are required to fill out the application form on the volunteers main page and send it in via email or post to AWH PO Box 29 Beerwah, QLD 4519 with university details attached.

Placements at the Australian Wildlife Hospital are in high demand, so it is recommended that you apply early! If you have any further enquiries, email your questions to kathyw@wildlifewarriors.org.au or call (07) 5436 2097.

Further informationEdit

Please click here for volunteer information brochures and application forms


http://www.wildlifewarriors.org.au/wildlife_hospital/volunteers.html

See alsoEdit

Australia zoo

http://www.australiazoo.com.au/